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Bilingual world

If you have the opportunity to use a bilingual support partner to help families who have learners working from home, it may be useful to prepare a list of questions for this staff member to ask. Bilingual support is extremely useful when making contact with parents who speak little or no English.

General care

  • Is everyone in the family well?
  • Do you understand the rules about going outside?
  • Are you going outside every day?
  • Are you meeting up with friends and family?
  • Is there someone who can help you if you need anything?
  • Are you worried about anything?
  • Have you got enough food and/or medicine?
  • Do you know how to contact the emergency services?

Accessing school work

  • Is your child working at home?
  • Is this easy?
  • Does ____ have access to a computer or similar device?
  • Does ____ have access to WiFi?
  • Do you have access to email?
  • Does ____ have a quiet space to work?
  • Does ____ have their school books at home?
  • Do you have paper and pens at home?
  • Do you have any story books at home?
  • Is ____ working every day on school work?
  • Do you know how to contact your school?

We’ve created an easily downloadable list of these questions to ask parents when calling home, which you can download by clicking on the button below.

Further learning - Blog

Created: Sun 16th Feb 2014

Here's a summary (the bare bones) of a procedure that gives you first steps to accomodating for new EAL arrivals. This is for those of you who have 'Teaching English as an Addidtional Langauge 5-11: A Whole School Resource' (click here for more info on this resource, training and online learning for new arrivals)

Created: Wed 6th May 2015

This morning my 4 year old woke up and said, "Mummy there are two languages, child's language and adult language". I asked her what she meant and she explained that when her friend was crying the teacher told her to read her the "owl" book. She then said, "The teacher reads the words but the child changes it." A young child may not be able to read, or retell the story using the actual words but often can retell it in their own words. A bit like a translation, as my daughter illustrated. The key factor is not the actual words, but the story behind the words.

Created: Tue 23rd May 2017

Brewster, Ellis and Girard (2012) discuss the idea of playing Bingo or Dominoes as games for connecting various curriculum areas. Brewster (2012) explains that playing games like these can be a support for learning target vocabulary, for example, playing a Dominoes game before or after reading where learners can either match the words or the pictures together as they listen is an excellent way to learn the target language. You may be studying the human skeleton vocabulary in the game and making connections to the class book e.g.